Weather Watches and Warnings (Infographic) header image

Weather Watches and Warnings (Infographic)

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When it comes to weather, Mother Nature is in charge. Whether it be a Watch or Warning, knowing the difference may save your life. Prepare, seek shelter and stay safe when wicked weather threatens.

Severe Thunderstorm Watch: There's the potential for severe thunderstorms to develop. Be ready to act if a warning is issued.

Severe Thunderstorm Warning: Severe weather indicates imminent danger to life and/or property - this includes potential for large hail, lightning, damaging winds, flash flooding and tornadoes.

Tornado Watch: Weather conditions are capable of producing tornadoes.

Tornado Warning: A tornado is sighted or indicated by radar. Seek shelter immediately.

Flash Flood Watch: Conditions are favorable for flash flooding or flooding in the watch area. Be alert.

Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is imminent or occurring can only take a few minutes to develop.

Fire Weather Watch: Conditions may result in either numerous fire starts or extreme fire behavior within the next 24 to 72 hours.

Red Flag Warning: Fire conditions are ongoing or expected to occur within the next 24 hours.

2015 United States Natural Hazard Statistics

  • Lightning: There are about 25 million lightning strikes in the United States each year
    • The average lightning bolt is about 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit – about 5x hotter than the sun’s surface
  • Tornado: 924 injuries from tornadoes
    • Tornadoes caused $316 million in property damage in 2015
  • Floods:
    • Floods caused $2.7 billion in property damage in 2014
    • Tip: 6” of flood water can sweep you off your feet
    • U.S. Flood Victim Activities in 2014 (latest year available)
      • Driving 66%
      • Walking 7%
      • Fell in 12%
      • Fishing 3%
      • Playing 5%
      • Other 7%
  • Wildfires:
    • 10 million acres burned in 2015
    • 4,636 structures destroyed
    • 68,151 wildfires reported nationally—a record year

Plan ahead to ensure you're prepared when wicked weather strikes. Call your Farm Bureau agent to talk about your current insurance policies.



Sources:
National Weather Service, National Interagency Coordination Center
weather.gov
National Weather Service

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